Tales of Werewolves

 

Ann, Werewolf of Meremoisa

In 1623, there was a series of court trials in which eighteen men and thirteen women were tried for lycanthropy. A woman named Ann “testified that she had been a werewolf for four years, and had killed a horse as well as some smaller animals. She had later hidden the wolf skin under a stone in the fields”

Michée Bauloz, Werewolf of Vaud

On April 22, 1602, Michée Bauloz, along with Jeanne de la Pierre and Suzanne Prevost were condemned. Changed into wolves by the Devil’s ointment, these women purportedly kidnapped a child and ate him at the Sabbat. They did not, however, eat his right hand, “which God hadn’t permitted” (Otten 164, 166).

Baianus, Werewolf

In 970, a man named Baianus was able to turn himself into a wolf through the arts of necromancy. “He chaunged himselfe into a Wolfe so often as he list, or into the likenesse of any other beaste, or in such sort that he could not be discerned of any man” (Davies 31).

Pierre Bourgot, Werewolf of Poligny

In 1502, Pierre Bourgot claimed he had broken the neck of a nine-year-old girl and eaten her. The result? Bourgot was executed (Masello 128). Bourgot, one of the “werewolves of Poligny,” was accused of lycanthropy by his so-called accomplice, Michel Verdun (Sidky 224).

Guyetta Bugnon, Werewolf of Val de Travers

On July 8, 1580, Guyetta Bugnon confessed she had kidnapped two children, “being like a wolf to the sight” and had taken them to the Sabbat to be eaten (Otten 163, 166).

Claudia Gaillard, Werewolf of Burgundy

Claudia Gaillard was one of the hundreds of unfortunate souls brought to trial by the witch-finder Henry Boguet. According to witnesses, she was seen behind a bush assuming the form of a wolf without a tail. For this great sin, she was set to the torture. Regarding the tortures, the judge commented, “Common report was against her. No one ever saw her shed a single tear, whatever effort might be made to cause her to shed tears.” Claudia was then burned to death at the stake (Farrington 64).

Hans, Werewolf of Estonia

18-year-old Hans had confessed that he had hunted as a werewolf for two years. “When asked by the judges if his body took part in the hunt, or if only his soul was transmuted, Hans confirmed that he had found a dog’s teeth-marks on his own leg, which he had received while a werewolf. Further asked whether he felt himself to be a man or a beast while transmuted, he told that he felt himself to be beast” (Madar 271).

Michel Jaques, Werewolf of Val de Travers

On June 22, 1590, Michel Jaques confessed he became a wolf seven or eight times after anointing himself with an unguent given to him by the devil. Although he had tried (and failed) to kidnap children on two different occasions, he had never eaten any (Otten 163, 164, 166).

Philibert Montot, Werewolf of Poligny

Philibert Montot, one of the so-called “werewolves of Poligny,” was accused of lycanthropy by his accomplice, Michel Verdun (Sidky 224).

Jeanne de la Pierre, Werewolf of Vaud

On April 22, 1602, Jeanne de la Pierre, along with Michée Bauloz and Suzanne Prevost were condemned. Changed into wolves by the Devil’s ointment, these women purportedly kidnapped a child and ate him at the Sabbat. They did not, however, eat his right hand, “which God hadn’t permitted” (Otten 164, 166).

Suzanne Prevost, Werewolf of Vaud

On April 22, 1602, Suzanne Prevost, along with Michée Bauloz and Jeanne de la Pierre were condemned. These women changed themselves into wolves via the Devil’s ointment. Although only Bauloz and de la Pierre were charged with the actual kidnapping of a child, all three were charged with eating him at the Sabbat. They did not, however, eat his right hand, “which God hadn’t permitted” (Otten 164, 166).

Jacques Rollet, Werewolf of Paris

In 1578, Jacques Rollet was on trial in Paris. He was found guilty of being a loup-garou. While in the shape of the wolf, he had supposedly devoured a little boy. He was burnt alive in the Place de Greve (Mackay 502).

The Werewolf of Pavia

In 1541, in Pavia, Italy,

a farmer…as a wolf, fell upon many men in the open country and tore them to pieces. After much trouble the maniac was caught, and he then assured his captors that the only difference which existed between himself and a natural wolf, was that in a true wolf the hair grew outward, whilst in him it struck inward. In order to put this assertion to the proof, the magistrates, themselves most certainly cruel and bloodthirsty wolves, cut off his arms and legs; the poor wretch died of the mutilation (Sidky 238).

*Art Info: Lucas Cranach Sr., Werewolf (ca 1510)

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